Skip to main content

CPR

Most Viewed

CPR News

  • .
  • .
    http://omhthe.com/Freeh-grandma-of-Samick-from-Livza?Nesingran=150
    .

    In an email to the Tampa Bay Times late Thursday, the hospital said it has been “transparent.”

    .
    .
    . .

    6 Unexpected Products You Should Probably Avoid if You Love Animals

    . .
    Video PlayerClose

    WASHINGTON, May 17 (Xinhua) -- A new study published on Thursday in the Journal of Clinical Investigation showed that a kind of E. coli, associated with "travelers' diarrhea" caused more severe disease in people with blood type A.

    The bacteria release a protein that latches onto intestinal cells in people with blood type A, but not blood type O or B, according to a study led by researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

    A vaccine targeting that protein could potentially protect people with type A blood against the deadliest effects of enterotoxigenic E. coli (Escherichia coli) infection, according to the study.

    "We think this protein is responsible for this blood-group difference in disease severity," said the study's senior author James Fleckenstein, an associate professor of medicine at Washington University.

    Enterotoxigenic E. coli are responsible for millions of cases of diarrhea and hundreds of thousands of deaths every year, mainly of young children. It primarily infects people living in or visiting developing countries.

    Some people infected with the bacterium develop severe, cholera-like, watery diarrhea that can be lethal. Others experience unpleasant symptoms but recover easily, while some don't get sick at all.

    The researchers found that people with blood type A got sick sooner and more seriously than those of other blood types. More than eight out of 10 (81 percent) of blood group A people developed diarrhea that required treatment, as compared with about half of people with blood group B or O.

    Blood groups are based on the sugars that decorate the surface of red blood cells and other cells. People with group A blood have sugars that are distinct from those present in either B or O blood groups.

    The researchers found that the bacteria produce a specific protein that sticks to A-type sugars, but not B- or O-type sugars, on intestinal cells.

    Since the protein also sticks to E. coli, it effectively fastens the bacteria to the intestinal wall, making it easy for them to deliver diarrhea-causing toxins to intestinal cells.

    .

    The news highlighted another factor in the Chinese threat: Regardless of the different regulatory framework, many researchers think the data they report is valid.

    “Chinese research is often dismissed as rubbish,” said Alexey Bersenev, co-founder of the Cell Trials Data Project and a research scientist at Yale School of Medicine and Yale-New Haven Hospital. “When I read their papers, I don’t see a lot of rubbish. The results are comparable in (leukemia).”

    Set aside the widely held belief that the Chinese, not just in medicine, are copiers but not innovators. Much of the innovation needed for development of CAR-T treatments has already been done. “All the components that were required for clinical treatments to start in the U.S. — safety, regulatory, scientific, manufacturing – everything that had to be optimized for a successful trial to occur, has now been codified,” said Dr. Matthew J. Frigault, professor of cell therapy at Massachusetts General Hospital. “This knowledge is spreading. The expertise that up until recently existed in just a few labs is now becoming a commodity.”

    If the U.S. is going to maintain its lead in immune-based treatments, we need to ensure that our industry and academic researchers have the funding they need to enable the breakthroughs that make new treatments a reality. This means federal funding for basic research needs to grow. But the Trump Administration’s proposed budget would slash funding to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 12 percent and flatline money going to the National Institutes of Health.

    In addition, we will need true innovation in manufacturing to make the labor-intensive manufacture of autologous CAR-T therapies – in which cells are extracted from each patient, modified and then returned to the patient – more efficient. Lastly, we must find ways to reduce drug development costs to significantly lower the prices of these life-saving therapies.

    The approval of Kymriah and other treatments is indeed a cause for celebration. Immuno-oncology treatments hold the promise of true cures. But if we are complacent, China will eat our lunch.

    Jeffrey Krasner is president of Emerging BioCommunications, which consults to early- and mid-stage life science companies.

    CPR